Archive for DIY Painting

Getting your old paint clean!

Super quick tip on getting and keeping your old paint clean

Crusty old paint can but pretty good paint inside…how can you get it out and back in without contaminating the paint?

You will need

  • A paint can opener
  • A ladies panty hose or a paint strainer bag from the home center or paint store
  • A clean bucket

Steps

  • Wipe off the top of the paint can and blow away all loose debris
  • Install the hose or strainer bag over your clean bucket
  • Pour your paint through the strainer then pull out strainer and throw out or rinse out.
  • When finished, pour unused paint back into paint can and put on lid
  • Cover the lid with a rag or paper towel before hammering in place to prevent splattering.

 More tips and tricksTip: using dirty bucket with clean paint

Painting Techniques…Dirty Bucket

Your only paint bucket is dirty….what to do!

Here are some tips and tricks to get the job done and paint back in the can when done

Tools and supplies you will need:
• A dirty bucket….or a clean one will do!
• A common plastic grocery bag
• A Throw away latex medical glove (always great to have around for messy projects)Color TrasistionsCrisp paint lines
More DIY

Fixing holes in walls

Some holes are just too big to fill with spackle…here’s how to do it

Fixing holes in your wall requires a few specialized tools


Tools and supplies you will need:
• A drywall “mud-pan”
• A 4″ and 6-12″ drywall “knives”…these are the wide metal tools with a handle for spreading the “mud”.
• A household sponge
• A squirt bottle
• Patching compound mud: this can be bought dry in a bag with several different types available that dry quickly. They are sold as 5 minute dry time on up to 45 minute dry time. If you have no time constraints then you can purchase a bucket of premixed “All Purpose” mud…just keep it covered!
• Clean your mud pan after each use or mud will dry in your pan and be very difficult to remove. Also do not put remainder fast dry mud (mixed from a bag) into the sink or toilet….it even dries under water and will clog your drains!
More DIY

 

Painting Tricks: color transition

Painting a sharp clean line between wall and trim

The technique is the same whether you want a sharp line on baseboard, crown, wainscot or really any type of trim

    • If the trim/wall junction has not yet had its open seam caulked then do it now (see previous blog on how)
    Allow to dry
    • If you have just caulked then, with your trim paint, go over the caulking and bring the paint onto the wall surface. Allow to dry. Note: if caulking is not painted over then, over time, it will collect dust that cannot be cleaned off
    • Note: if your trim is stain/clear finished then use clear caulk to fill any seams at color transition
    • Run a straight line of tape along the transition line and burnish edge

    • If trim is stain/clear finished then run a light bead of CLEAR caulk or clear varnish over the edge to bleed under any imperfect tape adhesion
    • If trim is paint finish then you can either clear caulk, clear varnish or brush a light coat of trim paint over the edge to bleed under any imperfect tape adhesion. Allow to dry
    • Now paint wall or ceiling color and be sure to overlap the transition tape edge. Pull up slowly at a sharp angle and you have professional result with a super clean, sharp edge! You are a “DYI” painter

Click here for more on crisp lines

Click here for Video on baseboard sharp lines

Refinishing exterior wood sills

Whether teak, mahogany, oak or douglas fir, Natural stained or varnished wood sills are very pretty.

But if not maintained, they can get pretty raggedy looking and even rot if water is allowed into unsealed surfaces.

Prepping a wood sill

  • If finish is failed and wood is very discolored it is often best to strip the sill. This can be done chemically or with a power sander.
  • After stripping and or sanding, often the wood has deep discolorations that can be removed with a specialized oxygen based (oxalic acid) wood bleach. Do not use household bleach (sodium hypochlorite) as this will damage the lignin in the wood. Sometimes it takes a few treatments of bleach to get back to like new looking wood
  • At this point you have a choice to go with a penetrating oil, straight clear finish or to stain and then finish. Staining is helpful when you want to blend the sill into the look of the adjacent door (click for more on wood doors)

Choosing your finish

  1. Penetrating type oils:
    • Teak oil, Sikkens SRD, TWP: these are easiest to apply and can give a color to the wood of your choosing. They are super easy to maintain but have to be recoated more often (every six-twelve months)
  2. Spar varnish:
    • Varnish gives the classic look that, with 3-4 (or more!) coats, can give a smooth glass like finish. This finish can last a long time if not subject to direct sun. Drawbacks are that you must sand between coats and if you let it go too long and some areas fail, the exposed wood will discolor and you will have to strip the sill and start from scratch.
  3. Tinted film forming stain/finish systems:
    • I believe these are the best balance of durability and ease of maintenance. I use these on garage doors and front doors as well (Click for more info). Products of this type are:
      • Sikkens Cetol Marine is a film forming translucent clear tinted finish that looks great on teak and mahogany as it has an amber tint that accentuates these woods. Cetol Marine also comes in a teak color that is suitable for teak, mahogany AND oak. Two coats minimum on bare wood with 3 being just right. It dries to a satin sheen and does not need sanding between coats. When maintenance is required, just recoat and failed areas will blend in as this is a tinted product
      • Sikkens Cetol 123 Plus: this an oil based system where the Cetol 1 is a stain available in various pre-packaged colors; it is applied to soak in to the wood and give a deep rich color. Cetol 23Plus (meaning 2nd, 3rd coats or more) is a film forming satin finish much like Cetol Marine but tinted in more colors and can be used on any type of wood
      • Water borne acrylic systems usually have a stain product and a clear finish product that can be tinted with the stain to “shade in” damaged areas. These can be very durable and dry superfast. Fast drying can really help in productivity but it takes a real pro to use these or finish can look uneven Products of this type are
      • ECS (Environmental Coating Systems) brand: manufactured in San Diego, I use this both inside and outside. For outside applications I use the “UV Extreme” and have finished beautiful mahogany doors
      • Sansin brand: is a stain/clear coating system out of Canada where natural wood finishes are the norm. We used this finish on a seaside project with Italian Albertini mahogany windows. (Click for more on Sansin)
      • General Finishes brand: this is a favorite of many wood workers and painters and is probably the most available of as it is distributed across the USA.

Painting Tricks: Crisp paint lines

Getting a crisp, clean and straight line can be easy as pie if you know the tricks of the painting trade

On an inside corner between two walls or walls and a ceiling that have an uneven texture, trying to brush along the rough surface results in a very uneven line. To get a smoother transition upon which to transition color with a clean line:

    • You will need a caulking gun, a tube of acrylic latex caulk, a small bucket of water and a small rag
    • First run a bead of acrylic latex caulking where the two planes (wall/wall or wall/ceiling) meet, dip your   finger in the water and run your wet finger over the bead of caulk; re-wet your finger as needed; use the rag to wipe excess of
    • Let the caulk dry for an hour or s
    • Paint surface and overlap inside corner a bit and allow to d
    • Now you can either free hand cut in the new color or use tape to create a sharp and straight paint li
    • If your color transition is dramatic, taping works best. If color transition is subtle the free hand cut in with a brush will be fi
    • If you use tape, you must seal the edge where the colors change by brushing the first color on so it will bleed under tape and seal it or you can run a light bead of caulk along the tape edge and, as before, run your wet finger over it. You do not need much caulk….just enough to seal the edge of the tape
    • Frog Tape by Shurtape is widely available and I highly recommend it. This specialty tape is formulated for sharp clean paint lines
    • On a 90 degree outside corner, you can use the same technique.
    • This is an especially good idea when color transition is dramatic and you want the line razor sharp.

• After just a few minutes, brush the new color along the tape and gently pull up the tape at an angle and “voila”, you are an expert “I did it myself! “DYI” painter

Get sharp lines between walls and baseboards

Sheet Metal Protects Wood Beams

Tops of exposed beams are very prone to rot and UV degradation….sheet metal is a beautiful answer

    A simple way to protect exposed wood from premature failure by using decorative sheet metal caps to keep water and subsequent rot from ruining your exterior trim! All exposed beams and rafter tails are covered like this when Peek Brothers Painting does the job.



click here for more sheetmetal protection

Painting Tips from The Home Pro Show

Paint tools and tricks for a homeowner to get a professional looking paint job with:

  • How to prepare your roller by getting loose hairs out easily so they do not end up in your paint on the wall
  • A scraper tool to quickly and efficiently remove peeling paint …..a carbide scraper is well worth the $20 investment
  • A 5 in 1 tool is the overall general tool that every painter keeps in his pocket….it is a scraper, putty knife and a great tool to open up cracks before filling,
  • And John displays a tool used by professionals to protect against lead contamination ….a HEPA vacuum sanding system by Festool.

Best paint for Bathrooms

Mildew Proof Paint for baths

Mildew Proof Paint for baths

In the past oil semi-gloss was used in baths/kitchens and laundries but with the emphasis on reducing chemicals VOC’s harmful to the ozone layer, many paints have become more prone to streaking as soaps and other surfactants used in bathing are deposited on painted surfaces and mar the surface with streaking.

I have found a couple that perform as well or better than old oil enamel:
Zinsser Perma-White paint is carried by many paint stores and can be tinted to most medium pastel colors. It is fantastic at keeping mildew at bay and not streaking….even in very steamy rooms. I have it in two of my own bathrooms; one a medium yellow and the other a medium turquoise…both were painted well over 5 years ago and are easily cleaned and have no signs of any mildew. Very low sheen eggshell

Comes in Deep Colors!

Comes in Deep Colors!

Benjamin Moore Spa and Bath is another very nice paint I have used with some clients who are looking for deeper tones and an almost matte finish….a very nice look in a bath.

Proper surface prep on KOGO radio

Cheap paint can cost you far more in the long run
Lack of proper surfaces preparation can make even the best paint fail.
How can you avoid these common pitfalls? John Peek, owner of Peek Brothers Painting explains surfaces preparation tips and techniques on KOGO radio on The Home Pro Show.