Archive for Painting techniques

Fine Paints of Europe Eco Hybrid oil enamel

 

Fine Paints of Europe on Coronado Home

The finest primer and paint available

  • FPOE oil undercoat is a true oil primer in the old tradition. It is a long oil primer so that it is slow to dry but really soaks in to the substrate and bonds like in the old days. It is thick and after a few days of drying, will sand to super smooth
  • After priming FPOE has two products for getting a surface mirror smooth. Both are old fashioned Swedish Putty. One is brush grade (applied with a brush) and one is knife grade (applied like spackle).  When this application is dry, we sand with 220-400 sand paper before applying Eco or Hollandlaq/DutchLaq
  • If you want the very finest in craftsman applied European finishes….Fine Paints of Europe is it!

Is oil paint still available?

Entry door with Fine Paints of Europe

Getting your old paint clean!

Super quick tip on getting and keeping your old paint clean

Crusty old paint can but pretty good paint inside…how can you get it out and back in without contaminating the paint?

You will need

  • A paint can opener
  • A ladies panty hose or a paint strainer bag from the home center or paint store
  • A clean bucket

Steps

  • Wipe off the top of the paint can and blow away all loose debris
  • Install the hose or strainer bag over your clean bucket
  • Pour your paint through the strainer then pull out strainer and throw out or rinse out.
  • When finished, pour unused paint back into paint can and put on lid
  • Cover the lid with a rag or paper towel before hammering in place to prevent splattering.

 More tips and tricksTip: using dirty bucket with clean paint

Spackles, Bondo and Marine Filler

Be careful, some common fillers will fail! So what is the difference?

Here are some of my favorite fillers, an one to watch out for…it will fail if used outside.

  • MH or Synko Spackle: this is a very easy to use exterior spackle…it is a bit hard to sand but it really adheres and fills all those uneven surfaces on fascias, siding and exterior trim with ease. It holds up well for years. Be sure to prime raw wood before applying spackle and then prime the spackle when dry for the most durable patches.
  • Bondo is a catalyzed polyester filler (costs about $40/gallon)  that can be mixed to dry in minutes to really move a job along. This filler is often mistakenly used on exterior wood….a big mistake as Bondo in hydrophilic…it will absorb water and expand causing the patch to delaminate and pop off your paint. It can be used on interior wood repairs but never outside.
  • 3M Marine filler is also a catalyzed filler (costs about $190/gallon) that can also be mixed to dry quickly. This product is formulated for marine environments and so is unaffected by water. I have patches that last for years with this product….every wonder why one painter bids more to do a project….this is one reason to hire the more expensive guy as he is using materials almost 5 times more expensive and understands why it is worth it.
  • Most painters buy whatever is available at the paint store; a craftsman can go cross discipline and find products that will give a better more durable result (like sourcing patch materials at a marine store!)

More on cheap materials

Preparing Galvanized Metal

Without proper preparation, paint will peel from galvanized metal!

Here are some tips and tricks to get the job done properly so paint adheres for the long term

Tools and supplies you will need:

  • Sponge; safety glasses; rubber gloves
  • A deep sink to rinse the metal
  • Five gallon bucket; 2 gallon bucket
  • Krud Kutter Clean and Etch
  • Rustoleum Cold Galvanizing Primer: a zinc rich primer for the cut edges of the galvanized metal

Steps:

  1. Wipe down the metal generously with the Clean and Etch and put in 5 gallon bucket without rinsing (you want the chemical action to work on the metal for 5-10 minutes).
  2. After 5-10 minutes, rinse the metal in clean water; wiping with a clean sponge
  3. Stack metal pieces so they can thoroughly dry
  4. Spray prime the un-galvanized, cut edges of the metal
  5. Full prime the metal before installation with an acrylic primer or an oil based primer specifically designed for galvanized

More on sheet metalMore on rot prevention with sheet metal
More DIY

Painting Techniques…Dirty Bucket

Your only paint bucket is dirty….what to do!

Here are some tips and tricks to get the job done and paint back in the can when done

Tools and supplies you will need:
• A dirty bucket….or a clean one will do!
• A common plastic grocery bag
• A Throw away latex medical glove (always great to have around for messy projects)Color TrasistionsCrisp paint lines
More DIY

Fixing holes in walls

Some holes are just too big to fill with spackle…here’s how to do it

Fixing holes in your wall requires a few specialized tools


Tools and supplies you will need:
• A drywall “mud-pan”
• A 4″ and 6-12″ drywall “knives”…these are the wide metal tools with a handle for spreading the “mud”.
• A household sponge
• A squirt bottle
• Patching compound mud: this can be bought dry in a bag with several different types available that dry quickly. They are sold as 5 minute dry time on up to 45 minute dry time. If you have no time constraints then you can purchase a bucket of premixed “All Purpose” mud…just keep it covered!
• Clean your mud pan after each use or mud will dry in your pan and be very difficult to remove. Also do not put remainder fast dry mud (mixed from a bag) into the sink or toilet….it even dries under water and will clog your drains!
More DIY

 

La Jolla Athenaeum Door Restoration

My childhood library in La Jolla is now the La Jolla Athenaeum Music and Arts Library. Driving by as I often do, I noticed the natural wood doors were not looking up to snuff. Now that my kids are grown and enjoying my as The La Jolla house painter , I offered my services gratis, to refinish these two French doors facing onto Girard Avenue.

Door refinishing is a specialty of ours at Peek Brothers and I enjoy the opportunity to work with the tools of my trade to keep my hometown looking sharp


• The wood door was in very poor condition so I stripped off the existing varnish.
• Using a Festool German vacuum sander, I removed all the old finish down to bare wood.
• Sikkens Cetol 1 stain was applied to darken the wood and bring out the Douglas Fir graining
• Three coats of Cetol 23 Plus was applied with sanding in between to insure a super smooth finish.
• The Cetol 123 Plus product builds to a nice satin sheen that is a touch softer and stays more resilient to heavy sun exposure than say, a spar varnish, which over time becomes harder and more brittle and thus prone to failure, especially on softer woods that expand and contract with heat and humidity changes like pine or Douglas fir.
• Entry doors or patio furniture made of Teak or Mahogany are very stable woods that look just stunning with Cetol Marine, a satin finish that is slightly tinted to enrich these natural hardwoods
If you have a front (or side) door that has been beaten up by the sun and needs some attention, we really enjoy wood refinishing and making the entry to your home really shine
You might wonder why I mention the sander I used by name? Festool makes quite possibly the finest sanding and dust collector system in the business. I particularly like that the sander has a very tight oscillation so it never leaves swirls in the wood that can ruin a finish. Also the vacuum attachment keeps dust out of the work area as it is collected right through the sander. When you are applying a fine finish, you cannot have any dust present. Clients love that it keeps our work areas nice and clean 
More on Entry Doors
More on refinishing Garage Doors
More on Historic preservation

 

Refinishing exterior wood sills

Whether teak, mahogany, oak or douglas fir, Natural stained or varnished wood sills are very pretty.

But if not maintained, they can get pretty raggedy looking and even rot if water is allowed into unsealed surfaces.

Prepping a wood sill

  • If finish is failed and wood is very discolored it is often best to strip the sill. This can be done chemically or with a power sander.
  • After stripping and or sanding, often the wood has deep discolorations that can be removed with a specialized oxygen based (oxalic acid) wood bleach. Do not use household bleach (sodium hypochlorite) as this will damage the lignin in the wood. Sometimes it takes a few treatments of bleach to get back to like new looking wood
  • At this point you have a choice to go with a penetrating oil, straight clear finish or to stain and then finish. Staining is helpful when you want to blend the sill into the look of the adjacent door (click for more on wood doors)

Choosing your finish

  1. Penetrating type oils:
    • Teak oil, Sikkens SRD, TWP: these are easiest to apply and can give a color to the wood of your choosing. They are super easy to maintain but have to be recoated more often (every six-twelve months)
  2. Spar varnish:
    • Varnish gives the classic look that, with 3-4 (or more!) coats, can give a smooth glass like finish. This finish can last a long time if not subject to direct sun. Drawbacks are that you must sand between coats and if you let it go too long and some areas fail, the exposed wood will discolor and you will have to strip the sill and start from scratch.
  3. Tinted film forming stain/finish systems:
    • I believe these are the best balance of durability and ease of maintenance. I use these on garage doors and front doors as well (Click for more info). Products of this type are:
      • Sikkens Cetol Marine is a film forming translucent clear tinted finish that looks great on teak and mahogany as it has an amber tint that accentuates these woods. Cetol Marine also comes in a teak color that is suitable for teak, mahogany AND oak. Two coats minimum on bare wood with 3 being just right. It dries to a satin sheen and does not need sanding between coats. When maintenance is required, just recoat and failed areas will blend in as this is a tinted product
      • Sikkens Cetol 123 Plus: this an oil based system where the Cetol 1 is a stain available in various pre-packaged colors; it is applied to soak in to the wood and give a deep rich color. Cetol 23Plus (meaning 2nd, 3rd coats or more) is a film forming satin finish much like Cetol Marine but tinted in more colors and can be used on any type of wood
      • Water borne acrylic systems usually have a stain product and a clear finish product that can be tinted with the stain to “shade in” damaged areas. These can be very durable and dry superfast. Fast drying can really help in productivity but it takes a real pro to use these or finish can look uneven Products of this type are
      • ECS (Environmental Coating Systems) brand: manufactured in San Diego, I use this both inside and outside. For outside applications I use the “UV Extreme” and have finished beautiful mahogany doors
      • Sansin brand: is a stain/clear coating system out of Canada where natural wood finishes are the norm. We used this finish on a seaside project with Italian Albertini mahogany windows. (Click for more on Sansin)
      • General Finishes brand: this is a favorite of many wood workers and painters and is probably the most available of as it is distributed across the USA.

Painting Tricks: Crisp paint lines

Getting a crisp, clean and straight line can be easy as pie if you know the tricks of the painting trade

On an inside corner between two walls or walls and a ceiling that have an uneven texture, trying to brush along the rough surface results in a very uneven line. To get a smoother transition upon which to transition color with a clean line:

    • You will need a caulking gun, a tube of acrylic latex caulk, a small bucket of water and a small rag
    • First run a bead of acrylic latex caulking where the two planes (wall/wall or wall/ceiling) meet, dip your   finger in the water and run your wet finger over the bead of caulk; re-wet your finger as needed; use the rag to wipe excess of
    • Let the caulk dry for an hour or s
    • Paint surface and overlap inside corner a bit and allow to d
    • Now you can either free hand cut in the new color or use tape to create a sharp and straight paint li
    • If your color transition is dramatic, taping works best. If color transition is subtle the free hand cut in with a brush will be fi
    • If you use tape, you must seal the edge where the colors change by brushing the first color on so it will bleed under tape and seal it or you can run a light bead of caulk along the tape edge and, as before, run your wet finger over it. You do not need much caulk….just enough to seal the edge of the tape
    • Frog Tape by Shurtape is widely available and I highly recommend it. This specialty tape is formulated for sharp clean paint lines
    • On a 90 degree outside corner, you can use the same technique.
    • This is an especially good idea when color transition is dramatic and you want the line razor sharp.

• After just a few minutes, brush the new color along the tape and gently pull up the tape at an angle and “voila”, you are an expert “I did it myself! “DYI” painter

Get sharp lines between walls and baseboards

Stained Wood Cabinet Touch Up with Mohawk System

Touch up damaged cabinets with Mohawk “Magic” stain pens:

  • We love to surprise our clients with how quickly we can tune up their natural wood cabinets
  • After carefully cleaning the surfaces a skilled craftsman color matches using various colored stain pens to blend in the color
  • After a few clear coats to match the existing sheen; the damaged areas look as good as new
  • This can also be done on furniture where we often find dings on chair and table legs


Click to see cabinet painting
Click to see varnishing
Click to see DIY sparybooth!